Steam Locomotives

The loco was ordered in 1908 by Howe's Plaster Works, to work between the private sidings (Howes Sidings Box) on the Settle & Carlisle near Cumwhinton, in Cumberland (as it was then), and their works at Cocklakes. This private branch contained quite a severe gradient up to the works - of which little trace is left today. Howes Plaster Works later became "Carlisle Plaster Co" and later part of British Gypsum.

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'Efficient' was built at the Caledonia works of Andrew Barclay & Sons in Kilmarnock. It is a standard Barclay saddle tank with 14" x 22" cylinders and 3' 5" driving wheels. Painted in the Kilmarnock firms usual green lined livery and lettering, it spent it's entire working life at McKechnie Brothers' copper smelting works at Widnes. It shared the duties here with a smaller Barclay engine named 'Economic', which failed to live up to it's name and was scrapped in 1955. There were also two 100h.p. Sentinels as well.

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Andrew Barclay No. 1833/1924  'Niddrie' - Ex- Niddrie Collieries (Lothian) AB 0-6-0ST had been stuffed and mounted at Broomhill Station on The Strathspey Railway. Bought by the Edinburgh Area Group, it was stored for some years in a shed in Leith Docks.

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Delivered new to the Southall Gas Works as No.4 Loco, it was named Alexander in preservation by it's new owner at the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre. Purchased by it's current owner in 1988 and transferred initially to Fleetwood, and then onto Southport in 1993. Alexander's restoration was completed at Southport in 1994, and spent a number of years working on the demonstration line.

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Delivered new to the Liverpool Corporation in 1928, the loco was later transferred to Lancaster Power Station in 1966, until moving to it's final place of work, Heysham Power station in 1971. The availability of high pressure steam meant that the fireless locomotive was a very efficient method of traction.

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'JN Derbyshire' was built at the Caledonia works of Andrew Barclay & Sons in Kilmarnock. It is a Barclay saddle tank with 12" cylinders. The loco was purchased by the Carlisle Plaster & Cement Company (now British Gypsum) and worked at their Cocklakes Works, near Cumwhinton.

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Andrew Barclay 2343 is one of six 10" Barclay locomotives that are preserved. 2343 is unique in having a boiler that sits higher up than the rest.
It worked all its life at the Kirkby Thore works near Penrith before being purchased for preservation and moved to Steamtown Carnforth. In 1965 she was named after one of the works managers, a gentleman by the name of Ken Boazman and she carried the nameplates until replaced by a diesel. Whilst at Kirkby Thore she worked with another Andrew Barclay, W.T.T which is also preserved.
She was used briefly when she first went to Carnforth and after 1972/73 she remained a static exhibit. She moved to Chasewater Railway and swapped boilers with Colin MacAndrew. Purchased in the May of this year she moved to her new home at Ribble Steam Railway in Preston where she will be eventually overhauled to working order.
http://on.fb.me/1RvzNTs

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The locomotive was built by the Andrew Barclay company in 1902 as works number 880. Photographs taken as late as 1966 show that Glenfield was still in productive use at its owner’s site, the Glenfield and Kennedy works at Bonnyton Road in Kilmarnock. Other conventional Andrew Barclay locomotives were also used at the works.

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Lucy was built by the Avonside Engine Company at Bristol in 1909 and delivered to the Hutchinson Estate & Dock Co. Ltd. at Widnes. She was one of three class B3 0-6-0STs supplied having 14" x 22" cylinders and 3' 3" driving wheels, a type so familiar for so long in Liverpool's dockland. They were named 'Gertrude', 'Lucy', and 'Mary' and dated from 1906, 1909 and 1913 respectively, and were named after the daughters of John Hutchinson, one of the founders of the Widnes chemical industry.

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M.D.H.B No.26 previously worked for the Mersey Docks and Harbour board in Liverpool. Originally earmarked to become the main engine at the Fleetwood Loco Centre, work was carried out on the restoration of the chassis and running gear.

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Delivered new to Haunchwood Colliery in North Warwickshire coalfield, the locomotive was transferred to Arley Colliery on closure of Haunchwood.The engine received a new boiler in 1950, manufactured by Andrew Barclay of Kilmarnock, and a new inner firebox in 1961, manufactured by Hunslet of Leeds, with a new tube configuration.

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Ribble Steam Railway-based Bagnall 0-6-0ST No. 2680 Courageous made its first 'light engine' test runs in the yard at Preston Riverside on 29th Jan, becoming the first locomotive to return to steam in 2014. The locomotive is now in regular service on our line.The locomotive has undergone a lengthy restoration by its current owner from near-derelict condition.

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The King spent most of it's life working for United Glass in London, before being transferred to St Helens. The loco last steamed in the late 1990's when on site at the Fleetwood Loco Centre, and will require boiler work before returning to traffic. The unusual well tank arrived on 23rd March 2002.

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A new exhibit arrived at Christmas 2010 to join the fleet of Industrial locomotives at the Ribble Steam Railway and the engine has been a TV star!

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Constructed by Sharp Stewart & Co to order 440, this 0-4-0 tender locomotive was one of a batch of eight locomotives constructed for the Furness Railway. It was completed in 1863 and is the country’s oldest working steam locomotive.This locomotive is currently based at Shildon.

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Grant Ritchie of Kilmarnock built 42 industrial steam locomotives between 1879 & 1920,  primarily to order from operators in Scotland, although a few locos were supplied South of the border they also built Colliery winding gear etc..

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5643 returned to steam at the Ribble Steam Railway Easter 2013 and is currently at the Embsay and Bolton Abbey Steam Railway on loan for 2015.

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Number 4979 Wootton Hall is one of an illustrious line of named locomotives of the Great Western Railway.

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Delivered new to the Corby site of the British Steel Corporation in Northamptonshire, the loco was originally given the running number 21, and worked alongside many similar classmates. This loco has returned to steam in May 2015.

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This is one of a number of identical engines built by the Hunslet Engine Company of Leeds for the South Kirby Colliery near Barnsley between 1923 and 1942.

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One of the ubiquitous austerity locomotives built by several manufacturers during World War II, this engine was built by Hunslet of Leeds, as works No 2890 in 1943 and went to the War Department for military use as No 75041.

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'Walkden', is the honorary name given to this example of a Hunslet Austerity. The locomotive was built during World War 2, and was despatched to France to help with the war effort, given the number WD75105. The locomotive is one of only three remaining examples of the class which were sold on to NS (Netherlands State Railways), where she worked until the late 1970s in their coal industry. 

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Respite had previously worked at the Astley Green, Ladysmith & Bickershaw collieries until 1978. It was then donated to the National Railway Museum in 1982, where parts were removed and used in the construction of the broad gauge replica Iron Duke.

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0-6-0ST 'Austerity' built by Hunslet (makers number 3793) in 1953 for WD (Army) use. Stored at Bicester by 7/53 but by 1955 was based on the Shropshire & Montgomeryshire Light Railway based at Kinnerley.

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Originally ordered for the Savile Colliery nr Leeds on February 1953, the order was changed that April to despatch the locomotive to Glasshoughton Colliery, where it duly arrived in  November 1954.

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“Cumbria” was built to the wartime “Austerity” design, slightly modified by Mr. R.A. Riddles, by the Hunslet Engine Co. of Leeds in 1953. It carries works number 3794. This loco returned to steam in May 2015. (Summer Season 2016 on loan at The Battlefield Line)

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1896-built L&YR number 1300 (later LMS 12322 and BR 52322) arrived at Ribble Steam Railway in mid-December 2009 (currently on loan at ELR)

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Working in busy dock and harbour environments necessitated small locomotives with short wheelbases, and at the turn of the last Century, the Lancashire & Yorkshire railway at Horwich designed and built a class of locomotives affectionately known as ‘Pugs’, specifically designed to work in the dockland areas of Goole, Fleetwood, Liverpool & Salford.

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The LMS Ivatt Class 2 2-6-0 is a class of steam locomotive designed for mixed traffic.
A total of 218 were built between 1946 and 1953, mostly at Crewe. The LMS classified them 2F, BR 2MT.

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No. 1439 was built by the LNWR at Crewe in 1865. It was rebuilt in November 1887 and again in September 1898. The original Ramsbottom chimney would have been replaced by a Webb pattern, at one of these rebuildings, and a cab added. As LNWR No. 3042, it worked for a period in and around Liverpool Docks, being fitted with bell gear and oil fuel apparatus for this purpose.

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Peckett 0-6-0ST No. 1636 'Fonmon'
Built for Aberthaw & Bristol Channel Portland Cement Co Ltd, it worked at their cement works and the Tumen Asbestos Works in Rhoose, South Wales.

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'Caliban' was completed by the Peckett works in February 1937 for Courtaulds, Preston.

On 2 May 1973 ex-Courtaulds large Peckett 0-4-0ST Caliban hauled the first trains on the Lakeside & Haverthwaite Railway

Arrived at RSR 14th July 2015

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Built for Black Park Colliery Co. Ltd., Denbighshire, Wales in November 1937. Delivered by the LMS to Chirk. Ended life at Bersham Colliery, Wrexham, Wales.

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This typical industrial shunting locomotive was built by Peckett & Sons of Bristol in 1941 for the Southport Gas Company. An unexpected feature of the painting schedule for 1999 was that Midland Railway livery was specified, together with the Southport Corporation Crest. Its duties included shunting coal wagons from Blowick sidings along to Southport Gas Works.

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The locomotive was supplied to the Ministry of Supply, used at first in Swynnerton Royal Ordnance factory.  It moved to the Royal Ordnance factory at Salwick, later the UK Atomic Energy Authority and finally BNFL. 

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Little Daphne has spent many years on the seafront at Lytham as a former playground engine. She arrived on 21st May 2002, and despite being in reasonable external condition, is not a candidate for restoration due to the extent of the damage to the boiler. Daphne will be scrubbed up and once again be displayed.

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Agecroft No.2 was one of three standard outside cylinder locomotives ordered by the Salford Corporation Electricity Department for use at Agecroft Power Station near Manchester where they shunted coal wagons from the power station to the coal tipplers. Works no 7485 was delivered in a goods train to Agecroft BR shed. Painted green and black lining edged with red on the outside and yellow on the inside, she was put into store nearby and did not commence work until December 1950.

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After spending most of it's life working for the Gas board in Cambridge, the small Sentinel moved to Carnforth, where it became a regular, in use for shunting & demonstration trains.

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St Monans is a 100hp geared four wheel steam locomotive with a vertical boiler and cylinders which was built in 1947 by the Shrewsbury firm of Sentinels Ltd.

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After World War II, the Southern Railway needed to replace ageing shunting engines at Southampton Docks. They decided to use the USATC built USA tanks.

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